Chipotle’s a company that understands and respects creativity. Here’s just one example why: They could’ve gone with a standard “No Smoking” message for their restaurants. But no. They actually took a few minutes (gasp!) to be like, “Hey, what if we have a little fun with it?” 
Point is: there’s a chance for injecting creativity into the seemingly dullest places. What’s more, by adding some zing to something as creative-less and trivial as a “No Smoking” sign, Chipotle is strengthening their brand, because people respect the few extra minutes the company took to think about what goes on its doors.
They’ve also applied that same mindset to their cups and to-go bags, which feature whimsical/thought-provoking short stories from some amazing writers. Yup, formerly boring “spaces”, made un-boring.
So when it’s easy to just go with the norm for a project, take a few extra minutes to think about if there’s opportunity to make it better. And then go make it fucking better. And then eat a burrito because yeah burritos. 

Chipotle’s a company that understands and respects creativity. Here’s just one example why: They could’ve gone with a standard “No Smoking” message for their restaurants. But no. They actually took a few minutes (gasp!) to be like, “Hey, what if we have a little fun with it?” 

Point is: there’s a chance for injecting creativity into the seemingly dullest places. What’s more, by adding some zing to something as creative-less and trivial as a “No Smoking” sign, Chipotle is strengthening their brand, because people respect the few extra minutes the company took to think about what goes on its doors.

They’ve also applied that same mindset to their cups and to-go bags, which feature whimsical/thought-provoking short stories from some amazing writers. Yup, formerly boring “spaces”, made un-boring.

So when it’s easy to just go with the norm for a project, take a few extra minutes to think about if there’s opportunity to make it better. And then go make it fucking better. And then eat a burrito because yeah burritos. 

How a follow-up email got me a job.

Emails can be boring, or they can be fun.

Make them fun, and sometimes they’ll get you a job.

Recently, I chatted with one of my mentors, who also happened to interview and hire me at Energy BBDO when I applied for a copywriting internship (which turned into the full-time job I have now).

He said even though our initial interview went well, I was still up against a few other super talented applicants, and he was having a tough time making a final decision.

But then he told me that it was my follow-up email that set me apart from the others. I was totally not expecting to hear that, mostly because people don’t usually think follow-up emails really do anything.

So here’s the email I sent:

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So to any aspiring (or current) creatives out there, the moral of the story: follow-up emails don’t have to suck. They can be yet another way to show off your creativity. Or to thank them for feedback on your portfolio. But mostly as a reminder to whomever you meet that you’re different, in all the best ways.

So yeah, that’s it for this edition of “Hassan pretends to know what he’s doing.” Tune in again for more tips soon!